STUDIES

Environment / Air Quality

LIST OF ENVIRONMENT/AIR QUALITY STUDIES

Hazardous Materials/Truck Traffic Study 2016
Corpus Christi Ozone Advance Annual Reports
Corpus Christi MPO Mitigation Planning Protocol
Avoid, Minimize, Compensate: Mitigation Policy & Implementation
The Roles of Private For­ Profit & Nonprofit Organizations in Mitigating Resource Impacts of Infrastructure Projects
Naval Station Ingleside Impact Report


HAZARDOUS MATERIALS/TRUCK TRAFFIC STUDY 2016

Published September 2016

The City of Corpus Christi/Nueces County Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC), in partnership with the Corpus Christi Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) and with technical assistance from Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI) conducted a hazardous materials (hazmat) commodity flow study (CFS) in 2016 to update a previous CFS for the area from 2010. The impetus for this work arose when decision makers in the region raised the question as to whether undertaking a routing process for hazardous materials truck traffic would minimize risk on the new Harbor Bridge. Upon investigation, local transportation and emergency planners determined that updated commodity flow data were needed to make such a determination.

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS/TRUCK TRAFFIC STUDY 2016

CORPUS CHRISTI OZONE ADVANCE ANNUAL REPORTS

Published Annually

These reports fulfills the annual reporting requirements of the 8 Hour O3FLEX Memorandum of Agreement approved on October 23, 2007 for the Corpus Christi Air Shed. This report includes the required annual assessment of ozone monitoring data and analysis for the period of August 1, 2011 – April 30, 2012; the effectiveness of voluntary or mandatory control measures in conjunction with improved technical understanding of the ozone problem during the period of August 1, 2011 – April 30, 2012; recommended mid-course corrections to action plan; and, latest information on implementation of control measures.

The Ozone Annual Reports are provided by the Coastal Bend Air Quality Partnership formally the Corpus Christi Air Quality Group. The Partnership is Chaired by Gretchen Arnold. Partership participants include the City of Corpus Christi, Nueces County, Corpus Christi Regional Transportation Authority, Corpus Christi Metropolitan Planning Organization and the Port of Corpus Christi Port Authority provide funding annually to sponsor Chair functions of the Partnership. The Partnership meets quarterly and all meetings are open to the public.

MAY 2019 - DECEMBER 2019 MAY 2018 - MAY 2019 MAY 2017 - MAY 2018

MAY 2016 - APRIL 2017 MAY 2015 - APRIL 2016 2013 8-03FLEX MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT

2012 8-03FLEX MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT 2011 8-03FLEX MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT

CORPUS CHRISTI MPO MITIGATION PLANNING PROTOCOL

Published November 2010

This protocol is promulgated by the Corpus Christi Metropolitan Planning Organization (CCMPO) both in direct response to Section 6001 of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) and in the interest of helping its constituent agencies and jurisdictions more effectively respond to the sometimes competing demands for protection of the fragile ecosystems of the Texas Coastal Plain and good stewardship of public funds in infrastructure projects.

CORPUS CHRISTI MPO MITIGATION PLANNING PROTOCOL

AVOID, MINIMIZE,COMENSATE: INFRASTRUCTURE MITIGATION POLICY & IMPLEMENTATION

Published June 2010

Today, the concept of “mitigation” has evolved to be applied many types of resources in addition to water. Impacts to endangered species habitat, air quality, noise, stream banks, prime soils, viewsheds, cultural and historic sites, and many other resources are mitigated for a variety of reasons and in a variety of ways. But no matter what type of resource, the basic protocol of “avoid, minimize, compensate” is universally followed to address the impacts of construction, land use changes, and other human actions on the resources.

This study examines infrastructure mitigation policy and procedures in Texas with particular emphasis on the mitigation of water resources under CWA and endangered species habitat under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). It reviews roles and responsibilities of all levels of governmental and quasi-governmental agencies in implementing mitigation policy, and provides key contact information for the major agencies most cognizant of and involved in mitigation. It also examines the emerging and growing practices of air quality mitigation as they relate to the current Clean Air Act and analyzes likely future impacts of new legislation 3 currently under development by Congress to address global warming as a function of air quality.

AVOID, MINIMIZE,COMENSATE: INFRASTRUCTURE MITIGATION POLICY & IMPLEMENTATION

PROTECTING TOMORROW: ROLES OF PRIVATE FOR-PROFIT & NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS IN MITIGATION RESOURCE IMPACTS OF INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS

Published April 2010

Mitigation was given a major boost in the passage of the Clean Water Act (CWA) in 1972 and its reauthorization in 1977, when water quality standards were strengthened and greater protections put in place. CWA establishes a shared authority for the protection of water resources between USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Section 404 of CWA codifies the “avoid, minimize, compensate” protocol and guidelines for applying the protocol to federally sponsored or permitted projects. This was formalized into policy through Executive Order 11990 Protection of Wetlands issued by President Carter in 1977, which directs federal agencies to: “…avoid to the extent possible the long and short term adverse impacts associated with the destruction or modification of wetlands and to avoid direct or indirect support of new construction in wetlands wherever there is a practicable alternative...". This has the effect of forbidding the use of federal funds in projects that adversely impact wetlands without mitigation of those impacts.

ROLES OF PRIVTAE FOR-PROFIT & NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS IN MITIGATION RESOURCE IMPACTS OF INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS

NAVAL STATION INGLESIDE IMPACT REPORT

Published August 2008

The U.S. Department of Defense Base Realignment and Closure Commission’s (BRAC) 2005 recommendation to close Naval Station Ingleside (NSI) on the northern shore of Corpus Christi Bay will result in the near-term loss of almost 3,200 active duty military and civilian/contractor jobs and nearly 3,700 indirect jobs. However, successful redevelopment of NSI will create new jobs for the region’s residents, new revenues for the region’s local governments, and improve the economic vitality of the region as a whole.

NAVAL STATION INGLESIDE IMPACT REPORT

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FEDERAL GRANT

The preparation of this report has been financed in part through grant[s] from the Federal Highway Administration and Federal Transit Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, under the State Planning and Research Program, Section 505 [or Metropolitan Planning Program, Section 104(f)] of Title 23, U.S. Code. The contents of this report do not necessarily reflect the official views or policy of the U.S. Department of Transportation.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Contact the Corpus Christi MPO at (361) 884-0687 or EMAIL us, if you have any questions on any of these studies.